Friendship Club
Bring a friend or two to Friendship Club on Tuesday, May 16, at 10:30 a.m., in the Friendship Room, followed by lunch in The Gathering Place. Program details were unavailable as The Intercom went to press, but Friendship Club always offers an interesting program, good fellowship, and a tasty lunch!

Remodeled Mother’s Rooms
OSL has unveiled two remodeled Mothers’ Rooms for moms and babies, just in time for Mother’s Day.

In addition to other comfortable areas in the building, moms may use the Sonshine Room (west side, near the Nursery and Sanctuary) and the Caring Ministries Treatment Room (east side, across from the Celebrate Center; pictured here). Look for the Mother/Baby signs, or ask an usher or greeter.

These rooms are designed to offer privacy and relaxation, as well as toys for brothers and sisters. The rooms have been available for awhile now, but Caring Ministries will host an “open house” for them on Mother’s Day, May 14: come sign up for a door prize and enjoy a healthy treat!

A Reformation Journey with Martin Luther
Here We Walk: A Reformation Journey with Martin Luther continues this month! Pick up a map of significant places in Luther’s Germany, then follow in his footsteps by keeping track of your physical activity—walking, swimming, yoga, aerobics…anything that gets you moving counts! If you exercise 30 minutes every day, you will complete the journey in six weeks. Turn in completed forms by Sunday, May 28, to be eligible for prizes. Maps are available in Caring Ministries.

Contact Caring Ministries for more information!

Health Ministries
Our Savior’s has a number of ongoing health ministries that meet on a weekly or monthly basis. Feel free to join any of the following sessions. For more information, contact Michelle Anderson, Faith Community Nurse, 336-2942, ext. 48, or mianderson@oslchurch.com.

Footcare Clinic
Cost is $25 per person. Wednesday, May 3, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Call the Church Office, 336-2942, to schedule your appointment.

Hope for Living with
Illness or Cancer

Every Tuesday at 2:00 p.m. in the Friendship Room. People and their families who have or are experiencing the challenge of cancer are welcome. If you cannot attend, but would like to be on our prayer and devotional mailing list, contact Michelle Anderson, Faith Community Nurse, 336-2942, ext. 48, or mianderson@oslchurch.com.

Knitting/Crocheting Ministry
Learn how to knit or crochet prayer shawls (to be given to people to remind them of God’s presence and love in their lives) and mittens and scarves (for missions).
Wednesdays, May 10 and 24, 9:30 a.m., Sonshine Rm.
2nd Saturday Knitters, May 13, 9:30 a.m., Sonshine Rm.

Good Grief
Every Thursday at 10:00 a.m. in Room 103. Offers support to anyone dealing with loss and crisis in their lives.

Pickleball
OSL-sponsored Pickleball: Mondays, 8:00 a.m. to noon and 5:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Tuesdays, 8:00 a.m. to noon
Wednesdays and Fridays, 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Thursdays, 1:00 to 5:00 p.m.

Memory Care Support Group
Saturdays, 10:00 to 11:00 a.m., Friendship Room or Chapel. For caregivers of those with Alzheimer’s and dementia, the group is a place for caregivers to share and to receive understanding and empathy. Contact Michelle Anderson, Faith Community Nurse, 336-2942, ext. 48, or mianderson@oslchurch.com.

Yoga and the Lord’s Prayer; Yoga, Mindfulness,
and Centering Prayer

All are welcome to Yoga and the Lord’s Prayer, taught by Gretchen Borgum, a certified yoga instructor who leads regular classes at First Lutheran Church and other locations in the community, and Allison Houg. Class will meet on Mondays through May 15, from 12:45 to 1:45 p.m., in the Labyrinth Room. Cost (supplemented by Thrivent) is $5 per class. No pre-registration required. Bring your own yoga mat if possible; a limited number of mats will be available.

In addition, Yoga, Mindfulness, and Centering Prayer will meet every other Saturday, from 10:00 to 11:00 a.m., in the Labyrinth Room. Allison Houg will lead this group, which costs $5 per class. Classes will meet on May 6, May 20, June 3, June 17, July 1, July 15, and July 29. All ages and abilities are welcome!

Stephen Ministry
What Does it Mean to Live Your Life in Limbo?, by Margot L. Nelson

ss_logo_tagline_blue
One dictionary definition of “limbo” is “an uncertain situation that you cannot control and in which there is no progress or improvement.” Many of us live our lives in uncertainty and/or lack of control, perhaps feeling stuck in a pattern we did not choose or cannot change ourselves. It may be that our lives are only temporarily in limbo. In other cases, it may seem like a perpetual state. What does it mean when life is in limbo? We can make peace with the uncertainty and release the misconception of control, or we can struggle to discover where our path is leading and attempt to regain a sense of control.

A dear friend of mine was recently reflecting on what she perceives as life in limbo—in her case, that limbo is related to a life-limiting diagnosis that she can neither change nor know how and when it will unfold. In our conversation, we talked about the opportunities and challenges this situation presents. We also talked about the illusion of control that most of us cling to as part of the human condition—thinking we can, at least to some extent, choreograph our future. We talked about the random and unpredictable character of our lives (“Anyone could get hit by a bus and die…”), but do we really believe that? And is this randomness and unpredictability essentially different when one can see the bus coming and it “has my name on it”? In many cases we subscribe to the belief that tragedy and death “…will happen to thee and to thee and to thee but not to me.”

So what are the opportunities (or gifts) of recognizing that our lives are in limbo? Here are some that my friend and I identified:
• Releasing the illusion of control provides freedom to live each day as a precious gift.
• Recognizing that one’s number of tomorrows is limited allows one to choose how to (and how not to) invest time and energy.
• Accepting a finite future presents a spiritual opportunity for openness to (and investment in) significant relationships with friends and loved ones, as well as with our God. This openness can help to make us alive to meaning and possibility in every ordinary and amazing day.
• In my friend’s circumstance, she has taken the opportunity to express appreciation to those with whom she has had a meaningful and inspiriting relationship—expressing messages of love and thankfulness that often are left unsaid.

Of course, there are burdens and challenges to living in limbo as well:
• Uncertainty goes against our grain and frequently brings about anxiety. As human beings, we are future-oriented; but this uncertain space calls us to embrace more fully living in the present as well as cherishing the past.
• Not knowing is often painful—e.g., being unsure if an encounter or a significant event or holiday may be the last.
• It’s a tough call to trust that we can weather whatever comes our way, that all will be well.

Uncertainty, illness, and death come to all of us, but as Christians we do not live in short- or long-term limbo alone. At Our Savior’s, we belong to a community that embraces us in both our sadness and our joy (through Stephen Ministry, pastoral staff, Faith Community Nursing, and relationships with fellow members), and God himself is with us in our turmoil. Thanks be to God!

“When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; and when you pass through the rivers, they will not sweep over you. When you walk through the fire, you will not be burned; the flames will not set you ablaze.” Isaiah 43:2

“Lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the world.” Matthew 28:20

OSL Women of the ELCA
Ten Prayerful Reflections for Our Faith Journey,
by Tami Skorczewski

“Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.” Philippians 4:6–7

Bible Study. God has blessed us with “sisters” throughout the generations with whom we can learn, hope, and dream. May’s devotional includes the following 10 reflections: When you are afraid; When you must say goodbye; When you don’t want to be generous; When you are at a crossroads; When people around you are struggling; When life is going your way; When you need forgiveness; When you feel alone; When you’re sure you are right; and When I am feeling jealous. (Source: gathermagazine.org.)

WELCA Circles. Twelve circles (“sisters”) meet for Bible study from September through June. Most circles meet on the third Thursday, at a variety of times and places; see bulletin announcements. The circles are Anna, Elizabeth, Glory & Grace, Goodness, Hope, Leah, Patience, Peace, Rachel, Rejoice, Renewing Faith, and Women of Faith. For more information, leave a note in the Church Office and a WELCA leader will contact you.

WELCA Leaders. The “sisters” who lead WELCA this year, besides myself, are VP Jodie Nielsen, Secretary Valori Maher, Treasurer Toni LeVasseur, Mission Action Chair Sandy Fischer, and Co-Advisors Lori Tendler and Karen Schwartz. I am very thankful for this hardworking and spiritual group.

Annual Mother/Daughter Luncheon. All women and their daughters are cordially invited to WELCA’s Annual Mother/Daughter Luncheon on May 13, beginning at 11:00 a.m., in The Gathering Place. The speaker will be Valerie Echter, a holistic health and lifestyle coach. Tickets are available at the Information Center on Sunday mornings or the Church Office during the week. Ticket sales end on May 7.

“A Mother’s love is the fuel that enables a normal human being to do the impossible.”
—Marion C. Garretty

Be Notified When The Intercom Is Updated!


Sign Up for The Intercom